Categories
Joint Events

H.I.P.S.T.E.R. launch

*POSTPONED* UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

After a day packed with music, dance and an instrument exhibit, join H.I.P.S.T.E.R. in celebrating its official launch on the 8th European Day of Early Music!

Categories
workshops

Dance Workshop: Introduction to Renaissance & English country dance

*POSTPONED* UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

Coachhouse, People’s Museum of Limerick

Felicity Maxwell, dance instructor

2 hours – Limited to 16 participants (18 and over)

Come lords, ladies, and gentles all, for an introductory workshop in the noble art of English Renaissance and country dancing with instructor Dr Felicity Maxwell.

In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, social dancing was used by the upper classes not only for recreation and flirtation but also to show off their physical and social graces and to symbolise a well-ordered society. In this workshop, we will be on our feet, learning three dances and how to have serious fun at a court or country-house ball. (If you’re a fan of period drama, this is for you!)

We will begin with the ‘Earl of Essex’s Measure’, a stately processional dance from Elizabethan England which aptly embodies the earl’s relationship with the queen: two steps forward, one step back. We will then move on to two country dances published by John Playford in the following century: ‘Heart’s Ease’, whose tune is requested in Romeo and Juliet by a minor character in want of consolation, and ‘Siege of Limerick’, a more stirring dance celebrating the end of the Williamite War – a defining moment in Irish history.

Please wear loose, comfortable clothes and flat shoes. No prior dance experience necessary.

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Categories
Concerts

Viola da gamba Concert: Fire in the Belly

*POSTPONED* UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

People’s Museum of Limerick

Sarah Groser, viola da gamba

Yonit Kosovske, harpsichord

Vlad Smishkewych, narrator

(40 mins, followed by Q&A)

French Baroque viol players and composers Marin Marais and Antoine Forqueray have been described as “the angel and the devil”—the former known for his sweet and gentle style, the latter for his earthy and gutsy style. Regardless of their differences, both were known to have been recognised virtuosos on the viola da gamba and established chamber musicians in the court of Louis XIV. Antoine’s son Jean-Baptiste Forqueray was also a viol player and composer, perhaps even more advanced in skill than his talented father. Jean-Baptiste was merely 5 years old when he performed before the King, who was immediately impressed. While the father and son had their own share of intense family drama full of jealousies and dysfunction (worthy of a reality TV show if they were around today), nonetheless in 1747 the younger Forqueray published 32 of his father’s works (alongside some of his own compositions) as pieces for viol with continuo, and again in 1749 for solo harpsichord, which was not entirely surprising, given that both his mother Henriette-Angélique Houssou and wife Marie-Rose Dubois were harpsichordists. These different versions—for viola da gamba and harpsichord—will be interwoven into this “Fire in the Belly” performance, featuring Forqueray’s Suite no 1 in D minor and Marais’ Suite no.2 in D major Book 4. This afternoon concert will conclude with a dramatized version of Marais’ Tableau de l’Opération de la Taille, a narrated depiction of a 17th-century urinary stone operation!

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Categories
Concerts

Recorder Concert: Chrome Attic

*POSTPONED* UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

People’s Museum of Limerick

Theresa Burton, recorder

Vlad Smishkewych, voice

Yonit Kosovske, harpsichord

Sarah Groser, viola da gamba

(40 mins, followed by Q&A)

Music in early 17th-century Italy was considered the avant-garde of its time, revolutionary and experimental. Composer Giulio Caccini even named his collection of solo songs Le nuove musiche (The New Music).  Ground-breaking compositional trends were part of a seconda prattica (second practice), also called the stile moderno (modern style). Both vocal and instrumental music aimed to dramatize the emotional power of poetry and move the listener by way of bold musical contrasts, symbolic rhetorical gestures, juicy dissonances, wild chromaticism, and flashy virtuosity, also called stylus fantasticus (fantasy or free style).

This programme features the Baroque recorder on a journey through virtuosic sonatas, variations, and a ciaccona. You will hear works by Antonio Bertali, Dario Castello, Giovanni Paolo Cima, Giovanni Battista Fontana, and Tarquino Merula, as well as Barbara Strozzi’s Lagrime mie (Tears of Mine)—her passionate cantata for solo voice and continuo— and a solo harpsichord toccata by Girolamo Frescobaldi.

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Categories
Concerts

Medieval Concert: Unexpected Innovations

*POSTPONED* UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

People’s Museum of Limerick

Vlad Smishkewych, voice, sinfonia, percussion

Sarah Groser, vielle

Michelle O’Connor, vielle

(40 mins, followed by Q&A)

Most modern impressions of the medieval period tend towards an antiquarian and dismal view of this period, so often referred to as the “Dark Ages.” Although it had its share of social backwardness (one could equally argue the same of our present age) it was nonetheless a time of great musical, literary, and artistic flourishing. Each generation of the so-called “long medieval period”—between the 9th through to the 14th centuries—saw itself as the vanguard of its time. Musical styles shifted rapidly in Europe, as plainchant incorporated the novel forms of polyphony that arose from within its own musical matrix (organum) and interwove this with versus, the new song genre that brought the troubadours to the fore in the 12th through 14th centuries. Freer polyphonic styles incorporated modal rhythmic structures, evolving into highly ordered motets that would eventually culminate in the Ars Nova, even giving rise to such esoteric forms as the jazzy Ars Subtilior. The opening concert of H.I.P.S.T.E.R.’s Early Music Day celebrations brings together many of these innovative musical styles, representatives of various forms of medieval-style Avant-garde from the 11th through 15th centuries, from Machaut’s songs and Dufay and Vitry’s motets to the offbeat wackiness of Ars Subtilior composers Ciconia, Solage and Cordier.

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