Categories
Uncategorized

Hearts Too Big (For A Small World)

Hearts Too Big (For A Small World)

Online Event for Culture Night 2020

Europe and America’s Pacific west coast are joined virtually, with an event bringing together singer Vlad Smishkewych (Ireland), vielle virtuosas Shira Kammen (USA) and Michelle L O’Connor (USA/Ireland).

Songs by the troubadours, trouvères and Minnesingers of France, Spain, and Germany will weave a hypnotic spell around listeners. The programme features medieval songs of love, travel, and long distances—proof that no matter the era, our hearts are indeed too big for such a small world.

Time: 6pm – 10pm (online viewings)

Genres: Digital Art / Film / Music / Performance

VIDEO AVAILABLE 18 SEPTEMBER 2020 from 6pm ONWARDS

Eventbrite link (for voluntary contributions): https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/hearts-too-big-for-a-small-world-tickets-116718934475

Categories
Joint Events

H.I.P.S.T.E.R. launch

*POSTPONED* UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

After a day packed with music, dance and an instrument exhibit, join H.I.P.S.T.E.R. in celebrating its official launch on the 8th European Day of Early Music!

Categories
workshops

Dance Workshop: Introduction to Renaissance & English country dance

*POSTPONED* UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

Coachhouse, People’s Museum of Limerick

Felicity Maxwell, dance instructor

2 hours – Limited to 16 participants (18 and over)

Come lords, ladies, and gentles all, for an introductory workshop in the noble art of English Renaissance and country dancing with instructor Dr Felicity Maxwell.

In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, social dancing was used by the upper classes not only for recreation and flirtation but also to show off their physical and social graces and to symbolise a well-ordered society. In this workshop, we will be on our feet, learning three dances and how to have serious fun at a court or country-house ball. (If you’re a fan of period drama, this is for you!)

We will begin with the ‘Earl of Essex’s Measure’, a stately processional dance from Elizabethan England which aptly embodies the earl’s relationship with the queen: two steps forward, one step back. We will then move on to two country dances published by John Playford in the following century: ‘Heart’s Ease’, whose tune is requested in Romeo and Juliet by a minor character in want of consolation, and ‘Siege of Limerick’, a more stirring dance celebrating the end of the Williamite War – a defining moment in Irish history.

Please wear loose, comfortable clothes and flat shoes. No prior dance experience necessary.

Buy tickets

Categories
Concerts

Viola da gamba Concert: Fire in the Belly

*POSTPONED* UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

People’s Museum of Limerick

Sarah Groser, viola da gamba

Yonit Kosovske, harpsichord

Vlad Smishkewych, narrator

(40 mins, followed by Q&A)

French Baroque viol players and composers Marin Marais and Antoine Forqueray have been described as “the angel and the devil”—the former known for his sweet and gentle style, the latter for his earthy and gutsy style. Regardless of their differences, both were known to have been recognised virtuosos on the viola da gamba and established chamber musicians in the court of Louis XIV. Antoine’s son Jean-Baptiste Forqueray was also a viol player and composer, perhaps even more advanced in skill than his talented father. Jean-Baptiste was merely 5 years old when he performed before the King, who was immediately impressed. While the father and son had their own share of intense family drama full of jealousies and dysfunction (worthy of a reality TV show if they were around today), nonetheless in 1747 the younger Forqueray published 32 of his father’s works (alongside some of his own compositions) as pieces for viol with continuo, and again in 1749 for solo harpsichord, which was not entirely surprising, given that both his mother Henriette-Angélique Houssou and wife Marie-Rose Dubois were harpsichordists. These different versions—for viola da gamba and harpsichord—will be interwoven into this “Fire in the Belly” performance, featuring Forqueray’s Suite no 1 in D minor and Marais’ Suite no.2 in D major Book 4. This afternoon concert will conclude with a dramatized version of Marais’ Tableau de l’Opération de la Taille, a narrated depiction of a 17th-century urinary stone operation!

Buy tickets

Categories
Concerts

Recorder Concert: Chrome Attic

*POSTPONED* UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

People’s Museum of Limerick

Theresa Burton, recorder

Vlad Smishkewych, voice

Yonit Kosovske, harpsichord

Sarah Groser, viola da gamba

(40 mins, followed by Q&A)

Music in early 17th-century Italy was considered the avant-garde of its time, revolutionary and experimental. Composer Giulio Caccini even named his collection of solo songs Le nuove musiche (The New Music).  Ground-breaking compositional trends were part of a seconda prattica (second practice), also called the stile moderno (modern style). Both vocal and instrumental music aimed to dramatize the emotional power of poetry and move the listener by way of bold musical contrasts, symbolic rhetorical gestures, juicy dissonances, wild chromaticism, and flashy virtuosity, also called stylus fantasticus (fantasy or free style).

This programme features the Baroque recorder on a journey through virtuosic sonatas, variations, and a ciaccona. You will hear works by Antonio Bertali, Dario Castello, Giovanni Paolo Cima, Giovanni Battista Fontana, and Tarquino Merula, as well as Barbara Strozzi’s Lagrime mie (Tears of Mine)—her passionate cantata for solo voice and continuo— and a solo harpsichord toccata by Girolamo Frescobaldi.

Buy tickets

Categories
Concerts

Medieval Concert: Unexpected Innovations

*POSTPONED* UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

People’s Museum of Limerick

Vlad Smishkewych, voice, sinfonia, percussion

Sarah Groser, vielle

Michelle O’Connor, vielle

(40 mins, followed by Q&A)

Most modern impressions of the medieval period tend towards an antiquarian and dismal view of this period, so often referred to as the “Dark Ages.” Although it had its share of social backwardness (one could equally argue the same of our present age) it was nonetheless a time of great musical, literary, and artistic flourishing. Each generation of the so-called “long medieval period”—between the 9th through to the 14th centuries—saw itself as the vanguard of its time. Musical styles shifted rapidly in Europe, as plainchant incorporated the novel forms of polyphony that arose from within its own musical matrix (organum) and interwove this with versus, the new song genre that brought the troubadours to the fore in the 12th through 14th centuries. Freer polyphonic styles incorporated modal rhythmic structures, evolving into highly ordered motets that would eventually culminate in the Ars Nova, even giving rise to such esoteric forms as the jazzy Ars Subtilior. The opening concert of H.I.P.S.T.E.R.’s Early Music Day celebrations brings together many of these innovative musical styles, representatives of various forms of medieval-style Avant-garde from the 11th through 15th centuries, from Machaut’s songs and Dufay and Vitry’s motets to the offbeat wackiness of Ars Subtilior composers Ciconia, Solage and Cordier.

Buy tickets

Categories
Special Events

Instrument Exhibit

*POSTPONED* UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

Sure to please visitors of all ages, our exhibit brings together original as well as reproduction instruments to delight and educate.

Come with eyes wide open and ears ready to be delighted! From 10:00am until 5:00pm, Early Music Day at The People’s Museum will feature a collection of instruments that are core to what early music and Historically Informed Performance are all about. Ever heard of a Rackett? Or cranked the handle on a hurdy-gurdy? Or maybe you’ve never seen a lute or a viol up close. Come see members of the wind, keyboard, percussion, brass, woodwind and weirdo families— and maybe get to touch a few! All Questions & Answers are welcome.


If you’d like to come to the exhibit with your school or other community or educational group, contact us in advance and we can make arrangements to best accommodate you!

Categories
Concerts

Musica Transpyrenaica: song journeys across European borders

10 March 2020 – 1:15pm

MIC Chapel, Foundation Building, Mary Immaculate College, Limerick

Eamon Sweeney, guitars

Wolodymyr “Vlad” Smishkewych, tenor

Featuring songs by John and Robert Dowland, tonos by José Marín, airs de cour by Etienne Moulinié and Spanish airs from French collections as well as styles from the Spanish period in Naples, in a programme that is a veritable grand tour of solo song during the 1600s.

Part of the Borderlines Project

The 16th century saw the art of the madrigal take flight across Europe. From its origins in the so-called Burgundian School, it was carried forward through the Renaissance by multiple generations of Franco-Flemish composers, until it found a happy home in Italy with composers such as Cipriano de Rore, Giaches de Wert, Luzzasco Luzzaschi and Luca Marenzio. This last composer’s name would fly back over the Alps, crossing the Continent and the Channel so that in 1588 a certain Nicholas Yonge collected several of Marenzio’s madrigals, setting them to texts in English by poet Thomas Watson. Yonge ordered publisher Thomas East—William Byrd’s assignee—to print them in an anthology titled Musica Transalpina. The success of this collection led Yonge to create two more anthologies in the decade to come and firmly embedded the madrigal style into the Anglophone world of the Renaissance.

The wonderful—and closely related—genre of solo song during the 17th century has an equally interesting and no less travelled story. In their programme ‘Musica Transpyrenaica: song journeys across European borders’, tenor Vlad Smishkewych and guitarist Eamon Sweeney journey across the Pyrenees, the Mediterranean, and the Alps too, flying upon wings of song to discover the many paths by which poetry was set to music during the cusp of the 16th to 17th centuries.

Categories
Concerts

Stars and Stones: an evening of medieval music

7 March 2020 – 7:30pm

Anita’s Gallery, Mountshannon, Co. Clare

Michelle O’Connor, vielle

Wolodymyr “Vlad” Smishkewych, harp, sinfonia/organistrum, percussion

Musical explorations and poetic symbols from Ireland to Iberia

Part of the Borderlines Project

From sacred medieval songs filled with poetic symbolism, from the dolmens and stone crosses of Ireland to the Campus Stellae of Santiago, and from ancient Celtic hymns to troubadour and trouvère music with origins along the pilgrimage and cultural paths of historic Europe, STARS & STONES explores the symbolic meaning behind these recurring medieval themes, including musically-inspired carvings on stone crosses, monuments, figures in the tympana and statues in churches where musical allegory was frozen into the carved stone, and music inspired by melodies that originated in the great stone sanctuaries of the middle ages: cathedrals and cloisters. This musical pilgrimage crosses the North Atlantic and includes stops in Ireland, England, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and more, and explores the intertwined history of place, pilgrimage, physical and allegorical symbol, using as inspiration the images found along these paths of stars and stones.

Tickets available on Eventbrite.ie.